Remember What It Was Like On the 5th of November?

Nov 6, 2017 11:30:00 AM / by Irene Kanthan

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Maureen is an official CAPA vlogger for fall 2017, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A BFA major at University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, she is studying abroad in London this semester.

In this week's post, Maureen remembers the 5th of November and experiences Guy Fawkes Day with her study abroad friends in London.

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Thanks Maureen!

Maureen's journey continues every Monday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA London Program

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Posted in: London, England, History Abroad, Activities Abroad

Visiting Kilmainham Gaol and Learning More Irish History

Oct 27, 2017 4:30:00 PM / by Irene Kanthan

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Tylor is an official CAPA vlogger for fall 2017, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Business Communication major at Arizona State University, she is studying abroad in Dublin this semester.

In this week's post, Tylor visits Kilmainham Gaol in Dublin and gets to know more about Ireland's history.

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Thanks Tylor!

Tylor's journey continues every Friday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA Dublin Program

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Posted in: Dublin, Ireland, History Abroad, Activities Abroad

Smile. Act. Repeat.

Oct 27, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Irene Kanthan

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Hanna is an official CAPA blogger for fall 2017, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Marketing, Finance, and International Business major at the University of Minnesota- Twin Cities, Carlson School of Management, she is studying abroad in Sydney this semester.

In this week's post, Hanna visits a historical Sydney site and tackles the issue of homesickness abroad as well as how to deal with it.

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I've been slowly getting back into the routine of my program since we had a couple of events come up. Last Saturday, we went to the soccer game, which Aussies as well as Europeans call "football." This was an A-League Match; Sydney F.C. was playing against Sydney Wanderers, which was one of the highly anticipated rivalries.

CAPAStudyAbroad_Sydney_Fall2017_From Hanna Okhrimchuk - Sydney FC and Sydney Wanderers Match_2.jpg

Modern soccer was introduced in Australia in the late 19th century by mostly British immigrants. The oldest club in Australia currently in existence is Balgownie Rangers. They formed in 1883 in Wollongong. Soccer is the most played outdoor team sport in Australia, and ranks in the top ten for television audience. Although the match was quite boring in terms of playing technique and it ended tied with score of 2:2, I really enjoyed it and the atmosphere was amazing.

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Posted in: Sydney, Australia, History Abroad, Homesickness

Getting Out of London to Greater England

Oct 18, 2017 3:30:00 PM / by Irene Kanthan

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Thaddeus is an official CAPA blogger for fall 2017, sharing his story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A BFA major at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, he is studying abroad in London this semester.

In this week's post, Thaddeus explores cities and towns outside of London and visits William Shakespeare's childhood home and grave.

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I have had the opportunity to travel a bit more outside of London to the greater parts of the U.K. such as Bath, Brighton, Stratford Upon Avon, and Oxford—both through CAPA and my own interest!

CAPAStudyAbroad_London_Fall2017_From Thaddeus Kaszuba - Just outside of the Roman Baths in Bath.jpg

Getting to explore greater England has been a very interesting way to experience U.K. culture and the less fast-paced urban life. These areas are also deeply rich with history that dates back to monumental eras of human cultural heritage.

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Posted in: London, England, History Abroad, Theater

Film Spools Are for Folio Fools

Sep 27, 2017 11:30:00 AM / by Irene Kanthan

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Thaddeus is an official CAPA blogger for fall 2017, sharing his story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A BFA major at the University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, he is studying abroad in London this semester.

In this week's post, Thaddeus goes through acting training in London and hunts for a 394-year-old Shakespearean transcript at the library.

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This week I started my sessions with the Globe Theater, as well as endured a very intense week of training. This week has been very informative in finding what I am lacking in my work as an actor.

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We have been working on restoration comedy pieces, which have been able to help me re-discover my sense of play that I have with myself - and translate that into my scene work. I think that is the next step in my training, which is quite a switch up from the very technique-driven curriculum that I usually am used to at the U of Minnesota.

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Posted in: London, England, Academics Abroad, History Abroad

Standing with History in Stonehenge and the Roman Baths

Sep 25, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Irene Kanthan

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Maureen is an official CAPA vlogger for fall 2017, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A BFA major at University of Minnesota - Twin Cities, she is studying abroad in London this semester.

In this week's post, Maureen gives us a crash course on the history of Stonehenge and the Roman Baths in England.

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Thanks Maureen!

Maureen's journey continues every Monday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA London Program

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Posted in: London, England, History Abroad, Activities Abroad

American History in London: Alice Paul on Tour

Apr 15, 2016 5:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

CAPAStudyAbroad_AmericanHistoryinLondon_Daniel_Walker_Profile.jpgDaniel Walker, a CAPA London Student Affairs Assistant, shares his knowledge of American History in London in a weekly CAPA World column.

This week, Daniel looks back on the life and work of Alice Paul in making greater strides toward equality for women both in the US and UK.

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It is to the substantial discredit of humankind that the struggle for gender equality persists in our time. That a little over half of all people are still arbitrarily disenfranchised in copious ways is a quite baffling feature of even our so-called advanced societies. Nonetheless, opposition to this discrimination is more widespread and dogged than ever before. Advancements in communications technology in the past few decades have given more women a platform to struggle and organize, and have provided the movement increased internationality and broader appeal. In its nascence, however, the women’s rights movement was more restricted by geography. For this reason, it is remarkable that the British and American movements developed in similar ways and roughly in tandem. It was largely thanks to a remarkable woman, and her name was Alice Paul.

First, it is worth noting that the landscapes in the United States and in Britain in the early 1900s were not, by any means, identical. The key issue being contested by women’s organizations was women’s suffrage in both cases. Race and class dynamics, though, were completely different on either side of the Atlantic—race being a definitive part of everyday life in America, class in Britain. There is more, of course. But the similarity in question refers to the organization and tactics used in the respective pushes for women’s suffrage.

American History in London: Alice Paul on Tour
Image: Cover to the program for the 1913 Womens Suffrage Procession, which Alice Paul organized (public domain)

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Posted in: History Abroad

American History in London: Cats in London

Mar 18, 2016 1:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

CAPAStudyAbroad_AmericanHistoryinLondon_Daniel_Walker_Profile.jpgDaniel Walker, a CAPA London Student Affairs Assistant, shares his knowledge of American History in London in a weekly CAPA World column.

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In the nineteenth century, the nascent United States of America—like the once rebellious adolescent who comes to appreciate their parents anew—took its cultural cues from the Brits. The British Empire still flourished, and its epicenter was London. The fads, fashions, and artistic inclinations of Victorian Londoners were circulated and emulated all over the world. Charles Dickens was the Taylor Swift of his day, though he went through fewer boyfriends.

This state of affairs didn’t last into the next century. The American government claimed everything beyond the Appalachians short of Russia, backed the right horse in a couple of World Wars, and the cultural flow was reversed. The cultural flow also grew more substantial with the concurrent leaps forward in communications technology. Whatever cultural storms were brewing in America around the turn of the century would be brewing in London before long. As it happened, a unique community of African American musicians were coming up with the basis for the next hundred years of music.

American history in London - Jazz
Image: Scott Joplin sheet music cover (public domain)

Jazz was the amalgamation of African American rhythms, work-songs, and blues with European music and instruments. It began with ragtime artists like Scott Joplin and was established as a genre by the famous improvisers of New Orleans in the 1910s. The impact of jazz on modern American music is widely recognized, but how did it make its way to cosmopolitan London?

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Posted in: History Abroad

American History in London: Jamestown Settlement

Mar 4, 2016 8:30:00 AM / by Stephanie Sadler

CAPAStudyAbroad_AmericanHistoryinLondon_Daniel_Walker_Profile.jpgDaniel Walker, a CAPA London Student Affairs Assistant, shares his knowledge of American History in London in a weekly CAPA World column.

This week, he takes a look at the Jamestown Settlement.

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The treatment of indigenous peoples in English literature has been predictably horrendous; loaded with colonial attitudes and prejudices. This mentality seeped into the minds of America’s first settlers, and sparked centuries of discrimination and violence against Native Americans. We can trace the path of this racial ideology from the streets of London to the barren east coast of seventeenth century America through the life of John Smith—in history and in myth. Apologies in advance to Disney fans for ruining Pocahontas.

Pocahontas
Image: Anna Rosemond as Pocahontas in the 1910 film, Pocahontas, by the Thanhouser Company (public domain)

Prior to becoming involved with the Virginia Company of London, Smith was living out quite an eventful youth. Following a dull childhood in Lincolnshire, he spent eight years larking around Europe and the Near East fighting indiscriminately for anyone with a cause and getting into trouble. He fought for Dutch independence from Spain, engaged in a little pirating, fought in the Long Turkish War, was sold into slavery, and escaped back to England.

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Posted in: London, England, History Abroad

Irish History: Marking the Centenary of the 1916 Easter Rising

Feb 24, 2016 5:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

DonalFallon.jpgWords by Donal Fallon, a historian and tour guide of Dublin, working with 'Historical Insights', the longest established walking tour company in the city. He blogs at 'Come Here To Me'.

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The Easter Rising of a centenary ago was neither the longest nor the largest rebellion in Irish history. Involving around 1,300 rebels in Dublin and only sporadic fighting beyond the capital, it began on a Monday and had collapsed by the following Sunday. Yet in spite of this, it occupies a very important place in Irish history and in the modern Irish psyche. Political independence, for much of Ireland, came only six short years later, and the Rising is considered to mark the beginning of Ireland’s revolutionary period.


Photo: The Easter Proclamation of 1916 (public domain)

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Posted in: History Abroad

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