Making Time

Dec 18, 2018 2:30:00 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

By the early 14th century…in textile manufacturing towns like Ypres… workers found themselves regulated not by the flow of activity or the seasons but by a new kind of time – abstract, linear, repetitive… work time was measured by the town’s bells, which rang at the beginning and end of each shift.
—Ray Patel, Jason Moore, “The True Cost of Cheap Food,” The Guardian, 8 May 2018.

Continue Reading

Posted in: Study Abroad, International Education, History Abroad

Colonialism, Post-Colonialism and Postcolonialism: What It Means for Education Abroad

Dec 4, 2018 8:35:09 AM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

History and Metaphor

Discussions of colonialism and its legacies are rarely conducted in an ethos of reasoned neutrality. In the midst of the passion and turmoil that marks the discourse, it is possible to discern two distinctive narratives.

The first is historical. In that context, the focus is on the imposition of European control over “less developed” regions and nations for approximately 80 years, broadly from the 1880s to the 1960s. The primary colonial powers were European. Geographically, while there were many colonized regions, much of the debate centers around Africa. The primary example of a colonial power is Great Britain, probably because it was the most dominant and long-lived. Post-colonialism refers to the subsequent emergence of independent nations, often following prolonged liberation struggles, in the 1950s and 60s.

Continue Reading

Posted in: Study Abroad, International Education, History Abroad, Politics

"I'll Kill You": Islamophobia, Anti-Semitism, and Memory

Nov 29, 2018 4:03:39 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

Blue-Remembered Hills

The playwright Dennis Potter (1935 – 1994) associated the idea of nostalgia for childhood with “blue-remembered hills”: a metaphor for locations distant in time that are formed and reformed in our memories. The notion of “blue-remembered hills” precisely captures the process of reconstruction through which we selectively revisit days long ago and the people who populated that dreamed space. We invest the past with colors that are emotionally, if not literally, true.

Continue Reading

Posted in: Study Abroad, International Education, History Abroad

Learning the History of Roman Baths

Nov 22, 2018 10:30:00 AM / by Mariah Thomas

Mariah Thomas

Mariah is an official CAPA blogger, sharing her story on CAPA World. A Journalism major at SUNY Purchase College, she is studying abroad in London.

In today's post, Mariah talks about the time she went on a CAPA London excursion to the Roman Baths and learned about its history and relevance.

---

CAPA hosts several excursions and My Global City events to help us explore the beautiful and vibrant city of London. One such event was the trip to the Roman Baths.

Overlooking the Roman Baths

The Roman Baths is located in the English City of Bath. It’s a preserved Roman site for public bathing. In ancient times, bathing was a common daily activity that was practiced through all of the different social classes

Continue Reading

Posted in: London, England, Activities Abroad, History Abroad

Wearing the Poppy: Poetry and the First World War

Nov 9, 2018 2:36:00 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

What we remember

The ending of the First World War (1914- 1918) will be widely commemorated on November 11th  2018. It was a global conflict that began and ended in Africa; thirty per cent of the British troops served on the Eastern Front. The conflict reshaped the international environment.  Old monarchies failed. The Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman Empires collapsed. New countries in Europe and the Middle East emerged from the ruins including Czechoslovakia, Poland, Yugoslavia, the Ukraine, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Trans-Jordan. The consequences of that war are still part of our global political landscape.

Continue Reading

Posted in: International Education, History Abroad, Cultural Insights

All That Jazz

Oct 11, 2018 4:30:00 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

The Attraction of the Jazz Joints

By and large, jazz has always been like the kind of a man you wouldn't want your daughter to associate with.
—Duke Ellington

Jazz is the language of the emotions.
—Charles Mingus

I spent a good deal of my mildly reprehensible youth listening to jazz in places where I was not supposed to be—predominantly in Soho in Central London. From about the age of 14, in the early 1960s, I began a lifelong love affair with jazz—not just the sounds but with the places in which it was played and the people who played it.

Soho has become gentrified in these days and few of the old, smoky subterranean jazz joints remain; none of them are smoky now of course and most have become boutiques or perfume shops—ironically sweet fragrances have replaced the heady mixture of sweat and tobacco. The most famous is Ronnie Scott’s jazz club but it has been deformed into a corporate “venue” for tourists and visiting business types (but at least it’s there, even if hideously expensively and much altered in ethos). These were refuges from respectability.

Continue Reading

Posted in: Study Abroad, History Abroad, International Education

Conversations in Brave Spaces: Jews and Black Americans

Sep 20, 2018 4:30:00 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

"Thoughts on Education Abroad" is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

---

Introduction: Safe and Brave Spaces

You might be forgiven for thinking that the history of black–Jewish relations in the United State was one of tension, suspicion, and hostility. For years, the only headlines to include blacks and Jews in the same sentence were ones that screamed mutual mistrust, such as the Crown Heights riot of 1991 and the inflammatory rhetoric of the Nation of Islam's Louis Farrakhan. And yet the truth of that history is more complicated than those examples might suggest…Coalitions of black and Jewish leaders founded the NAACP and the National Urban League; Jewish civil rights protesters and attorneys flooded the South for freedom marches in the '50s and '60s, while prominent rabbis marched arm in arm with Martin Luther King Jr.

"Black Sabbath: The Secret Musical History of Black-Jewish Relations" From the catalogue for 2011 exhibition at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco

abstract-pexels

From every human being there rises a light.

Baal Shem Tov (c.1700 – 1760).

One of the important conversations at the Diversity Abroad conference in Miami (March 2018) focused around a transition in thought from “safe space” to “brave space” in higher education. The idea of “safe space” is protectionist, intended to offer environments in which students who feel marginalized (by race, origin, sexual identity and so on) can feel unthreatened.

Continue Reading

Posted in: Study Abroad, History Abroad

A Day Trip to Malahide Castle and Garden

Aug 3, 2018 3:30:00 PM / by Rachel Howell

Rachel Howell

Rachel is an official CAPA vlogger for summer 2018, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Visual Media major at Auburn University, she is studying abroad in Dublin this semester.

In this week's post, Rachel goes on a day trip to Malahide Castle and Garden and shares some history and beautiful sights from this place.

---

Thanks Rachel!

Rachel's journey continues every Friday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA Dublin Program

Continue Reading

Posted in: Dublin, Ireland, Activities Abroad, Travel, History Abroad

Seeing the Magnificent Yu Garden and Its History

Jul 18, 2018 1:30:00 PM / by Zachery Burnham

Zachery Burnham

Zachery Burnham is an official CAPA vlogger for summer 2018, sharing his story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Finance major at  Champlain College, he is studying abroad in Shanghai this semester.

In this week's post, Zachery tours around the Yu Garden and observes the formations and history in this classic Shanghai landmark.

---

Thanks, Zachery!

Zachery's journey continues so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA Shanghai Program

Continue Reading

Posted in: Shanghai, China, Activities Abroad, History Abroad

Making My Way to Galway and Cliffs of Moher with My Flatmates

Jul 13, 2018 1:30:00 PM / by Rachel Howell

Rachel Howell

Rachel is an official CAPA vlogger for summer 2018, sharing her story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Visual Media major at Auburn University, she is studying abroad in Dublin this semester.

In this week's post, Rachel heads to Galway and Cliffs of Moher to experience the breathtaking views and another side of the Irish culture. She also takes us on a tour of her study abroad accommodation and introduces us to her flatmates.

---

Thanks Rachel!

Rachel's journey continues every Friday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA Dublin Program

Continue Reading

Posted in: Dublin, Ireland, History Abroad, Activities Abroad, Accommodation Abroad

Previous

All posts