How to Take Ownership of Your Personal and Professional Development Abroad

Dec 6, 2018 11:43:00 AM / by Stephanie Sadler

Let’s be honest: studying abroad is an incredible experience, but it’s not an automatic ticket to landing a job when you graduate. Yes, listing an international internship, for example, can make your resume stand out in an inbox full of applications, but it’s not until you learn how to talk about your experience in a meaningful way that your future employer’s ears will really perk up. And it’s not until you take ownership of your experience—by learning how to recognize, pursue, and nurture the skills that are key to your personal and professional development while you’re abroad—that you’ll be able to do that.

One of CAPA’s five Student Learning and Development Outcomes(SLDOs), set for those studying abroad in all of our cities, is a focus on personal and professional development.

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Posted in: International Education, Professional Development, Internships Abroad, Study Abroad, Barcelona, Spain, Dublin, Ireland, London, England, Sydney, Australia, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Shanghai, China

Colonialism, Post-Colonialism and Postcolonialism: What It Means for Education Abroad

Dec 4, 2018 8:35:09 AM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

History and Metaphor

Discussions of colonialism and its legacies are rarely conducted in an ethos of reasoned neutrality. In the midst of the passion and turmoil that marks the discourse, it is possible to discern two distinctive narratives.

The first is historical. In that context, the focus is on the imposition of European control over “less developed” regions and nations for approximately 80 years, broadly from the 1880s to the 1960s. The primary colonial powers were European. Geographically, while there were many colonized regions, much of the debate centers around Africa. The primary example of a colonial power is Great Britain, probably because it was the most dominant and long-lived. Post-colonialism refers to the subsequent emergence of independent nations, often following prolonged liberation struggles, in the 1950s and 60s.

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Posted in: Study Abroad, International Education, History Abroad, Politics

"I'll Kill You": Islamophobia, Anti-Semitism, and Memory

Nov 29, 2018 4:03:39 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

Blue-Remembered Hills

The playwright Dennis Potter (1935 – 1994) associated the idea of nostalgia for childhood with “blue-remembered hills”: a metaphor for locations distant in time that are formed and reformed in our memories. The notion of “blue-remembered hills” precisely captures the process of reconstruction through which we selectively revisit days long ago and the people who populated that dreamed space. We invest the past with colors that are emotionally, if not literally, true.

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Posted in: Study Abroad, International Education, History Abroad

How A Semester Abroad Transformed My Career Goals and Trajectory

Nov 29, 2018 10:07:00 AM / by Guest Posts

After interning abroad with CAPA Sydney in 2013, alumna Kristen Geatz realized she wanted change her career path from law to international education. Read about more about her experience and where she is now!

In my current role at IIE, when people ask me what my degree is in, I get some very strange looks when I answer. I guess “I have a Bachelor of Arts in Law and Society” doesn’t make much sense in a world where everyone studied international relations or global affairs. But in a roundabout way, my degree had everything to do with my love for international education, and my time abroad with CAPA was transformative in shaping my career goals and trajectory.

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Posted in: Sydney, Australia, Internships Abroad, International Education, CAPA Alumni, Professional Development

Feeling Grateful for Daily Life as a Student in Florence

Nov 22, 2018 10:45:00 AM / by Payton Meyer

In this week's post, Payton expresses what she's grateful for—the chance to experience a semester abroad and Thanksgiving in Florence. Her daily life hasn't been the same since the beginning of the fall, so read on to see what her new routine and habits are like and how she'll be spending Thanksgiving abroad.

Ciao! This week, I thought I would describe a typical day in the life of a CAPA student, and why I find it so interesting to live and study in Florence. First, let’s talk about Mondays.

On a typical Monday morning, I wake up around 10 am and start my stroll to class shortly after. I live about a 15-minute walk (20 minutes if I’m feeling hungry and stop for a croissant) from CAPA, and make my way through one of my favorite squares in the city, Piazza Della Repubblica, preceded by alleys lined with high-end designer retail stores. The square has been under construction since I’ve been in Florence, making it a bit less picturesque, but I’ve been able to see some pretty cool Roman ruins that lie beneath the Florentine streets as a result of the excavation process. The square is a hot spot for street performers that station themselves in front of the carousel and play beautiful acoustic versions of well-known songs, surrounded by happy onlookers. I always leave myself a little extra time to stop, listen, and remind myself how cool it is that I live here.

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Posted in: Florence, Italy, International Education

The Reality of Studying and Interning Abroad in Shanghai

Nov 21, 2018 10:30:00 AM / by Rachel Epp

In this week's vlog, Rachel Epp talks about balancing her classes, assignments, her internship, and travel, giving us the real real on daily life abroad. 

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Posted in: Shanghai, China, International Education

Collaborating with CAPA London Students Through Globally Networked Learning

Nov 16, 2018 11:35:00 AM / by Lorenzo Corazzin

In this week's post, Lorenzo describes his experience working with his student peers in London on class projects through Globally Networked Learning at CAPA Sydney. Globally Networked Learning allows students and faculty to go beyond timezones and distances to collaborate during classes for lessons and projects. See what Lorenzo learned from this international experience!

The classes I am taking with CAPA this semester are International Marketing, Advertising & Promotions, and International Organizational Behavior (focusing on Asia-Pacific). Since this is a study abroad program, it makes sense that many classes are globally-oriented, but there is even more to it with CAPA. In fact, CAPA organizes projects for each “International” class where you collaborate with study abroad students taking the same course in another location; for us, that location is London. In today’s modern economy where more teams and workers are doing their job remotely, this is a chance to see how well you could deal with the assignment.

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Posted in: Sydney, Australia, International Education

Two Emerson Students Compare their Semesters Abroad

Nov 12, 2018 1:33:43 PM / by Amaia Rioseco

In this week's vlog, Amaia Rioseco visits her roommate from back home at her program in Paris, France. The two students chat over breakfast and compare their semesters abroad, discussing some common differences they've noticed between their life at Emerson College in Boston and their programs in Paris and Barcelona.

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Posted in: Barcelona, Spain, International Education

Wearing the Poppy: Poetry and the First World War

Nov 9, 2018 2:36:00 PM / by Dr. Michael Woolf

What we remember

The ending of the First World War (1914- 1918) will be widely commemorated on November 11th  2018. It was a global conflict that began and ended in Africa; thirty per cent of the British troops served on the Eastern Front. The conflict reshaped the international environment.  Old monarchies failed. The Austro-Hungarian and the Ottoman Empires collapsed. New countries in Europe and the Middle East emerged from the ruins including Czechoslovakia, Poland, Yugoslavia, the Ukraine, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Iraq, Lebanon, Syria, and Trans-Jordan. The consequences of that war are still part of our global political landscape.

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Posted in: International Education, History Abroad, Cultural Insights

Strategizing for Assignment Week in Dublin

Nov 7, 2018 2:30:00 PM / by Casey Rhode

In this week's post, Casey talks about what assignment week is in Dublin and what college life is like during this time, including the projects she has worked on so far!

I’m in shock how fast time has flown by. It is officially midterm time and assignment week. This means there is only a month and a half left of my time studying abroad! For those of you who don’t know, assignment week is a week off for us students. It is supposed to be used to work on midterm assignments that are due the following week. A time where you do all your research and hope it’s enough to get you a passing grade on the assignment.

Not to say assignments aren’t important in America, but they’re way more important here. Between my two Griffith College classes I have a total of five assignments for the entire semester. I have three essays for my Film Studies course, each worth 33.3% of my final grade. For my Visual Communications course, I have two assignments, one worth 40% and one worth 60%. I have no final exams at all this semester. Also, grades don’t go up to 100 here, they go to 70. This means that I need a 40 overall in my classes to pass, or I fail. Talk about stressed, right?

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Posted in: Dublin, Ireland, International Education