An Interview with CAPA Florence Professor Alessandro Marchi

Oct 10, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Irene Kanthan

Kristopher-Boryla-Profile-Photo.png

Kristopher (also known as Kip) is an official CAPA vlogger for fall 2017, sharing his story in weekly posts on CAPA World. A Finance major at University of Colorado - Boulder, he is studying abroad in Florence this semester.

In this week's post, Kristopher chats with CAPA Professor Alessandro Marchi on education, life in Florence, and the Cultural History of the Mafia.

---

Thanks Kip!

Kristopher's journey continues every Tuesday so stay tuned.

Learn More about the CAPA Florence Program

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education, Florence, Italy, Florence Interviews

How I Turned My Study Abroad Experience into a Career

Jul 3, 2017 8:30:00 AM / by Julie Ritz

A CAPA Alumna Interview: Sarah Morgan

CAPAStudyAbroad_London_Fall2010_From Sarah Morgan 1.jpg

Meet Sarah Morgan, a History major and Journalist and Fine Art minor from the University of Delaware who studied abroad in London during fall 2010. Below, she talks about how she got out of her comfort zone through study abroad, how the locals of London left an impression on her, and how study abroad led her to work abroad in international education.

CAPAWORLD: Tell us a bit about yourself.
SARAH MORGAN: Hi!  My name is Sarah Morgan, and I'm an alumna of the 2010 Fall CAPA London program!  Originally from New Jersey, I attended the University of Delaware for my undergrad degree, where I majored in History, and minored in Journalism and Fine Art.  During my time at UD, I studied abroad three times- in Puerto Rico, Greece, and my final experience was with CAPA in London!  I’m a bit of a bookworm, and also love photography and yoga.

Continue Reading →

Posted in: London, England, International Education, Interviews, London Interview

Exploring Space: Names and Monuments

May 26, 2017 11:30:00 AM / by Julie Ritz

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

"Thoughts on Education Abroad" is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

---

Last month I talked about how we negotiate airports. I tried to describe what we can perceive in the transnational staging posts of airports. I wanted to illustrate what even an elderly, myopic traveller can learn through observation. However minimal my insights, that exercise represented something that is critical in education abroad: seeking to understand unfamiliar environments in ways that teach us what these places have to say to us and how they can impact upon our own sense of being an effective actor, or otherwise, within the spaces we inhabit.

 space 2.jpg
Photo: public domain

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education, Global Cities

The Idea of Africa in Study Abroad

Mar 24, 2017 8:30:00 AM / by Julie Ritz

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

"Thoughts on Education Abroad" is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

- - -

Beyond Tarzan

I was raised in an environment in which Africa was a place almost beyond our urchin imaginations. If we envisioned it at all, it was through the lens of that most colonial of figures: Tarzan, a “noble savage” with an English accent.

We were dimly aware that Africa was a real place: we had seen it in dog-eared atlases. Now and again bits of Africa would be in the news as places inexplicably (we thought) seeking independence from the British Empire. For most of us, though, Africa was a blank space we filled with fantasies. It was never real. It was an idea.

relax-1137240_640.jpg
Photo: public domain

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

An American Abroad in London During the Brexit Vote

Mar 10, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

carly-1.pngWords by Carly Hamilton, a journalism major at the University of Missouri who studied abroad in London during summer 2016.

---

My study abroad experience this past summer in London, England revolved greatly around the Brexit vote. Prior to my arrival in the UK, I heard buzz about it but wasn’t able to fully understand the significance of this vote. Upon landing in London, that started to change.

I arrived in mid-May and the vote was set for Thursday, June 23rd. Every morning on my walk to work, I would see people standing on the Hungerford and Golden Jubilee bridges. They were just talking to anyone who would listen about why the UK should stay in the European Union. It seemed that every day, the cover of each newspaper had something to do with the upcoming vote. My interest in the matter grew immensely as I started to understand that I would be present for such a huge moment in history, especially if the vote was to leave.

pexels-photo-113885.jpeg

Once I got more comfortable at my internship with the travel PR agency known as the Brighter Group, I spoke with my supervisor, Stephen, about the vote and what it meant to him as a UK citizen. In summary, he explained to me that anyone who wanted to leave the EU was an idiot. He felt that the UK wasn’t nearly large enough to function on its own and that it would be a disaster if the vote were to leave. It was clear that everyone else in the office felt the same way, although they didn’t voice it as boldly.

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

Why We Should Teach the Bible

Feb 24, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

"Thoughts on Education Abroad" is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

- - -

What William Tyndale did

William Tyndale changed the world with words. His translation of the Bible into common English coincided with Gutenberg’s new printing techniques. The conjunction of a translation that was comprehensible to a wider population with the means of “mass” production reshaped the world. Tyndale was born in 1494 and executed for heresy and treason in 1536. The idea of extending access to the mysteries of religion ran counter to the elitist orthodoxies of the time. Nevertheless, Tyndale’s work paved the way for the King James translation and was responsible for the first step in a process that embedded the Bible into the consciousness of the English-speaking world for at least four centuries. He was a revolutionary.

The dissemination of the Bible did more than impact faith; literature in English reached deeply into biblical sources for creative energy and common reference. As a consequence, over centuries literature existed at two levels: the events and figures recorded in the works, and points of biblical reference commonly understood by readers. There was a shared context that, at a minimum, gave readers a field of common understanding. It is of course possible to read Shakespeare, Marlowe, Herman Melville, Nathaniel Hawthorne, T.S. Eliot (and a myriad of other English and American writers) and enjoy, at some level, intriguing stories. However, without at least a rudimentary knowledge of the biblical references the work is diminished. The reader is disconnected from the full meaning and is able to engage only at a relatively superficial level. An analogy with the visual arts is appropriate. How would an art historian understand the tradition of Western art without some knowledge of its critical sources? Without that awareness, we have a bunch of pretty and horrible pictures.


Illustration: Early printing press, 1568 (public domain)

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

The Dumb Economy, Post Truth, Fake News & other Linguistic Confusions

Jan 27, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Julie Ritz

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

"Thoughts on Education Abroad" is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

- - -

Introduction:  The Twilight Zone

Language is a tool for concealing the truth. - George Carlin.

“Post-truth” has recently been named as the word of 2016 by the Oxford Dictionaries. It is one of the concepts that, in our current political environment, seems to embody dislocation from what we have assumed is a logical world: Trumpit time – the age of President Trump and Brexit in surreal conjunction. It is one of those terms, like fake news or the knowledge economy, that bewilders if we stop momentarily to consider what it really means. Linguists like to talk about “families” of languages; post-truth belongs to a dysfunctional family of concepts that subvert the idea of a rational universe.

There is an unholy trinity of current concepts that illustrate semantic dislocation: the knowledge economy, post-truth and fake news move us towards a place described by Rod Serling as “another dimension … a land of both shadow and substance: the Twilight Zone”. [1]

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

5 Ways To Be More Global

Jan 17, 2017 1:30:00 PM / by Julie Ritz

We all belong to a community. Maybe it’s your town that you feel connected to, your place of religious practice, or the sports team that you compete with every week where you've found your closest friends. No matter how big or small, we are all part of a group in one way or another.

Eventually, you might want to take steps to expand your community or learn more about the world outside of your hometown. It can feel overwhelming if you don’t know where to start, so we’ve come up with five ways to help you broaden your perspective and go beyond to become a part of the global community that has formed in the world today.

10 Ways to Make Life-1.png

1. Discover your heritage.

When looking to discover more about the world, where’s a better place to start than with yourself? Even if you don’t know it, there’s a part of each of us that’s already global. You probably identify as an American today, but your ancestors (however distant) are likely to have come from other nations. Researching your own history is a great way to start learning about another culture that you may even feel a special connection to. If you’re Native American, you can take the opportunity to learn more about the ways in which your culture exchanged with others who ended up here and why that makes you such an important part of this country and its history.

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

The Ever-Changing Cityscape as it Defines the Space We Learn In

Dec 29, 2016 1:30:00 PM / by Julie Ritz

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

Thoughts on Education Abroad” is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

- - -

Brave new world

I experience the impact of technology on a daily basis - literally, when someone walks into me while they are texting without looking where they are going. We all use mechanized transport and buy lunch without money (cash is increasingly anachronistic). At work, we send e-mails to people who are across the world and ten feet away. For the most part, if and when we stop to think, we generally rejoice in the many benefits of this brave new world.

It is easy for an old guy to be cynical, but even old guys know that our lives are so much easier these days while we remain aware of some negative consequences. The automobile bestows freedom of mobility in ways that would have been undreamed of in the lives of our ancestors even if, simultaneously, it poisons the air our children breathe. Public and private transport has widened the urban environment and created the possibility of suburban life, as well as making many places accessible for pleasure and profit. Air travel has redefined distance and reduced notions of space. Mobile telephones enable us to communicate at any time and in any place whether or not we have anything to say.

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education

Sounds familiar? Roma & Memory

Nov 24, 2016 1:30:00 PM / by Stephanie Sadler

Dr Michael Woolf CAPA International Education

Thoughts on Education Abroad” is a monthly column written by CAPA The Global Education Network's Deputy President and Chief Academic Officer Dr. Michael Woolf.

- - -

"There are lies more believable than the truth."
"The caravan is our family, and the world is our family."
- Roma sayings

One of the standards by which we recognize a civil society is the degree to which minorities are respected and protected from persecution, both by custom and law. For that reason, we oppose discriminatory policies and reject hate speech. In short, the degree to which we condemn advocates of intolerance based on ethnicity, race, religion, sexual preference (and so on) is a measure of civilized values.

Those values are compromised in the case of the Roma: a people defined by those who mistrust, fear or hate them. The common name “gypsy” is, for example, based on the entirely mistaken notion that they originated from Egypt. The confusion of Romanians and Roma further demonstrates ill-informed perceptions. “Gypsy” denies the distinctive histories, customs and beliefs of communities spread throughout most parts of the world. In short, their history and identity has been distorted. Constructed identities, clustered around notions of rootlessness and clannish cohesion, create the necessary pre-condition for persecution: a reductive classification in which irrational fears of alien values can be located. This cluster of characteristics is also associated, in Nazi ideology, with Jews. Negative stereotypes reduce individuals to a simplified set of imagined behaviours. Primitive prejudices find points of focus and permit a perverse rationale for dehumanisation.

640px-Flag_of_the_Romani_people.svg.png
Image: Roma flag

Continue Reading →

Posted in: International Education, Civil Rights

Previous

All posts